College Student Murdered After Getting Into Car Mistaken For Uber

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College Student Murdered After Getting Into Car Mistaken For Uber

University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson and suspect Nathaniel David Rowland. (Columbia Police Department)

University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson and suspect Nathaniel David Rowland. (Columbia Police Department)

University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson and suspect Nathaniel David Rowland. (Columbia Police Department)

University of South Carolina student Samantha Josephson and suspect Nathaniel David Rowland. (Columbia Police Department)

Kathryn Dykes, Staff

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Samantha Josephson, a 21 year old student at the University of South Carolina, called an Uber around 2 a.m. Friday in Columbia. Video surveillance showed her getting into a black Chevy Impala, which she had mistaken as her Uber. She had separated from her friends earlier that night and the next day they began to worry when she would not return their calls. Around 1:30 pm, Samantha was reported missing. Turkey hunters found Samantha’s body in a field in Clarendon County, about 90 miles away, 14 hours after she was last seen leaving the bar. Josephson had numerous wounds to her head, neck, face, upper body, leg and foot according to arrest warrants released Sunday by the State Law Enforcement Division. The documents didn’t say what was used to attack her. David Rowland, 24, was arrested and charged in the death after Josephson’s blood was found in the trunk and inside Rowland’s car along with her cellphone, as well as bleach, window cleaner and cleaning wipes. The area Samantha’s body was discovered was reported as “very difficult to get to unless you knew how to get there”. Students at the University of South Carolina have embraced the #WhatsMyName campaign, which urges riders to ask drivers “What’s my name?” to make sure they’re getting in the right car, after the school president encouraged students to do so.